helloradness:

Girls are told to be skinny but not too skinny and to wear makeup but not so much that guys can tell and to dress in revealing clothes but not too revealing or else you’re a slut and a hundred other contradictory standards so I think guys can deal with being made fun of for wearing fedoras

4 months ago with notes (315849)    via (root)








Source: gaydicks420 Via: rozlett
You look way better without all the cosmetics on your face!

indikos:

noms-heart:

indikos:

Thank you! You have no idea how long I’ve been waiting for some stranger to come around and tell me their opinion on a skill I’ve been perfecting for years! Especially a stranger who has barely any idea what I look like without makeup, seeing is I don’t post my nude face on the internet!

You have no idea how excited I get when someone says "Hey gurl! I know you love cosmetics, you apply them very well after years of study and practice, and it’s a form of self expression, and I know you didn’t ask me, but… all that’s a fucking waste :D"

When you tell someone who chooses to wear cosmetics almost daily that they look “way” better, you’re not being a nice person. You’re telling them that they have bad taste, bad aesthetics, poor perception. It’s like me going into someones bedroom and telling them it looked way better before they decorated it, when they acquired a lot of specific decor, and they’ve been developing the aesthetic I see before me for years.

If you want to tell someone that you think they look nice without makeup, don’t tell them one is better or worse. You have a friend, a girlfriend, a mother, whatever… and you see them without their makeup, just tell them they’re pretty or that their skin is nice.

And don’t tell people they don’t need makeup. You’re assuming you know what their needs are or their personal goals. You can tell them that you’re accepting of them with or without, or just don’t say anything at all. (**I learned this from my boyfriend :3)

Especially not to strangers on the internet

What a cunt. Don’t be such a bitch and take the fucking compliment. They could have not tried to compliment you at all. If you throw a bitch fit when someone says something nice, no one will ever want to again if you’re gonna be a difficult twat.

Wow, so I’m a cunt, a bitch, AND a twat because I’m not suped that some stranger has the audacity to tell me I look good one way or another. Comments on MY appearance are not some fucking commodity that I trip over myself to get to. The shit other people have to say about my choices regarding my aesthetic doesn’t validate my existence.

You’re not gonna sit here and tell me what’s a compliment and what I should be grateful for you dumb ass weak ass bitch

Stay in your lane, clearly commentary and original posts are not your strong points, stick to reblogging gifs of other weak bitches having pillow fights and photos with dumb writing over them because really I’m too fucking kawaii for this shit, really.

I promise you, I am not the one. 

4 months ago with notes (1723)    via (root)








Source: indikos Via: lattendicht
"On the other hand, a lot of anti-makeup sentiment– particularly anything that starts talking about how “frivolous” and “shallow” makeup is– is also misogynistic and femmephobic. Makeup is a form of visual art. If making your face beautiful is shallow, so is making a canvas beautiful or a block of marble or a hunk of plastic. If you understand why someone would feel satisfied and happy when they make a gorgeous print, you understand why someone would feel satisfied and happy when their makeup looks perfect. I do not think it is accidental that the form of visual art almost entirely practiced by women is the one that gets accused of frivolity and where the talent exhibited by many of the artists is ignored or denigrated."
4 months ago with notes (16416)    via (root)








batchix:

thescarletwoman:

astallascliffss:

panda-face-mew:

Always see “real women” posts so here’s one for the dudes.

this says so much. I wish there were more posts like this. please.

body positivity and realistic body standards are important for guys too!

Men are constantly reassured that it’s okay to oogle women and harrass them about their looks.  Women rarely see sexualized images of men that are made for women.

Guys get eye candy everywhere they go.  Their sexual gaze is constantly catered to.  Women* are rarely given the opportunity to have their sexual interest entertained.  We’re told that we should be okay with having nothing to look at.  That our fantasies don’t matter.  That we shouldn’t ever even remotely expect to be able to eyeball a svelte man in public, only behind closed doors and heaven forbid that the man look vulnerable.  So we finally get to see images that turn us on and people are like, “Hey, you can’t put that in magazines!  that might hurt some little boy’s feelings!”

Men are given alternative physical images to aspire to. Women are not. 

While yes, guys should be treated to body positivity too… they already are.  Just watch TV or any comedy and count the number of pudgy, out of shape, male leads vs pudgy, out of shape female leads.  Or the number of hairy, overweight, older men making block buster movies vs the number of hairy, overweight, older women.  Now count how many times that male character has some incredibly smart, sexy wife who does everything for him.  And then how many times she’s the butt of the joke when he gets hot for some woman who’s younger and thinner than she is.

Fuck, just look at the responses to women not shaving their legs vs the responses to guys not shaving off their stubble.

Name six movies about a woman above the age of forty who’s love interest is a man that’s younger than she is where the plot doesn’t revolve around her being the butt of a cougar or mom joke.  Now name me six where a man over the age of forty’s love interest is a woman who’s significantly younger than he is.  Bonus points for action movies where anyone in the movie makes a mention of the age difference.

How many times are male politician or CEO’s body or style of dress put into question?  How many times are female’s?  Or has everyone forgotten how we flip out when the president’s wife gets a new hair cut?  Or how Hillary Clinton had to have a FUCKING MAKE OVER before the news agencies took her seriously?  How many times was her daughter raked over the coals for looking like an average teenager?

What’s more, I’ve never heard any of my female friends or my mother and her female friends saying, “Why can’t my 50 year old husband get a six pack like that?”  What I USUALLY here is “I wish my husband would get a nice hair cut.” or “I wish he’d wear some nicer clothes that actually fit him.” 

But what i hear overhear men saying all time is, “No fat chicks!” or “I wish my wife had bigger boobs.” 

I know a woman who’s husband threatened to leave her if she didn’t get a face lift and a boob job- she was so upset that she did it.  She felt disgusting every day because she wasn’t a size six and he expected her to be a size six after bearing him four kids.  My own uncle said if his wife got overweight that he’d drag her behind a car until she lost weight.  These aren’t even “bad guys”!  They seem like perfectly nice men when you meet them!  But they’re taught from the moment they’re kids that all women need to be a certain body type to be worthy of any attention. 

Men are told through our culture’s stories and media that a woman will still love them unconditionally and throw themselves at them if they’re fat, old, balding, or an asshole, while women are told that if they’re pushy, fat, old or wearing out of style clothes that they aren’t even worth mentioning.

*While I’m bisexual, but I’m not a lesbian so I can’t speak for what a lesbian finds attractive anymore than I can say what a gay man might find attractive.  I’m talking about the female gaze toward men in general.  We each have our individual tastes tho.

4 months ago with notes (121609)    via (root)








"According to their survey, men hate when women wear beanies, floppy hats, hair bows, open-side shirts, oversize sweaters, shoulder pads, peplums, bandeau bikinis (“they just make your shoulders look like a linebacker”), bright lipstick, heavy eye makeup, fake nails, bangles, pointy-toed shoes, wedge sneakers, ultra-high heels, fold-over ankle boots (“it looks like the shoes have foreskins”), high-waisted jeans, high-waisted shorts, high-waisted skirts (“it lacks a certain degree of subtlety”), pantsuits (“you’re a woman, not a man”), drop-crotch pants (“really, any loose fitting pants,) and mullet dresses (“I just don’t get it — where’s the fucking party??? You are covering the back!”). The question is how to wear all of these things at once."
4 months ago with notes (99431)    via (root)








4 months ago with notes (650)    via (root)








chloridecleansing:

lerpthemerp:

chloridecleansing:

"boys don’t like a girl with dark lipstick" 
"boys don’t like a girl with short hair"
"boys don’t like a girl with too many piercings"
"boys don’t like a girl who doesn’t take pride in her appearance"

I  D O   N O T  C A R E

As a boy, this is practically a checklist for things I look for in a woman.

i do not give a shit about your personal attractions that is literally what this post is about

5 months ago with notes (164385)    via (root)








"Thin-shaming is wrong. It is bad and it is harmful and I long for its eradication and I will dance upon its corpse with my fat feet. But it’s important to note that thin-shaming is a symptom of the fact that all women’s bodies are policed all the time—not evidence of some culture-wide, systemic campaign to stigmatize thinness. Thinness is valued. Thin bodies are privileged over fat bodies. Despite the efforts of body positive activists (whose express goal, by the way, is to promote the acceptance of all bodies, including fat ones, not to further women’s oppression by gratuitously shaming the thin), “I’m proud to be fat” is still a radical statement. “I’m proud to be thin” is the status quo."
5 months ago with notes (5205)    via (root)








religiousmom:

So I am socially required to shave my legs and armpits but white boys aren’t socially required to shave their stringy greasy failed mini moustaches

5 months ago with notes (195998)    via (root)








kiwianaroha:

memoirsofahealthnut:

enroutewithyou:

WTF

wow

Eww. There is something wrong when you look at a picture of one of the most beautiful women in the world and think that a computer generated image is still more attractive than an actual human body.
Also changing the proportions of her legs like that is bizarre, do they not realize she would have trouble walking with those proportions?

kiwianaroha:

memoirsofahealthnut:

enroutewithyou:

WTF

wow

Eww. There is something wrong when you look at a picture of one of the most beautiful women in the world and think that a computer generated image is still more attractive than an actual human body.

Also changing the proportions of her legs like that is bizarre, do they not realize she would have trouble walking with those proportions?

5 months ago with notes (376741)    via (root)








feminishblog:

whydontihatemarrymyself:

vajoochie:

how do boys look good without makeup

thats it. thats literally it. entirely. for serious though

One of the realest things i’ve ever read. I think about this all the damn time.

5 months ago with notes (867662)    via (root)








Source: vajoochie Via: muffinw

fuckyeahfeminists:

fitspocouture:

healthybohemian:

this is so important

Oh my god

Makeup really does a lot hot damn

5 months ago with notes (341386)    via (root)








"

Say you’re walking down the sidewalk on a beautiful day. Someone who has internalized an outsider’s perspective of herself will often spend more time adjusting her clothing or hair, wondering what other people are thinking of her, judging the shape of her shadow or reflection in a window, etc. She will picture herself walking – she literally turns herself into an object of vision – instead of enjoying the sunny weather….

… Women are constantly being looked at. Even when we’re not, we’re so hyperaware of the possibility of being looked at that it can rule even our most private lives. Including in front of our mirrors, alone.

"

Excerpt via Beauty Redefined ”To BE or to be LOOKED at?”  (via fitvillains)

Good Gawd, THIS. 

I’m working to re-define my thinking about myself and walk in the glorious space of not being an object for other people’s visual consumption and the freedom it brings. 

And reminding people of that fact when they feel compelled to comment. 

(via str8nochaser)

Fuck.

(via versatilequeen)

"Judging the shape of her shadow" Yep. Yep yep yep yep. 

(via neutralgenius)

6 months ago with notes (12160)    via (root)








"The media WANTS women to hate their bodies. They depend on it, in fact.

More wrinkle cream is sold to women who feel old, more diet pills to women who feel fat and more douches to women who feel dirty…

If we stop hating ourselves, they’ll lose billions.

"
6 months ago with notes (38460)    via (root)








sierramckenzie:

This is hard for me to post but I feel like it is important. I remember hating my face and hating my skin and looking at all the girls around me in middle school and on tv and in ads and feeling like I was a monstrosity in comparison. But I remember the first time I realized women plucked their eyebrows. And wore concealer. And foundation. And powder. I felt like I had been lied to about what women look like. After modeling and realizing when photographers asked for no makeup, they really meant the photo on the right. I started realizing that the photo on the right was what was in skincare ads and posted by people claiming in the caption to be wearing no makeup some of the time. The photo on the right is the bare minimum of what we expect women to look like when they wake up in the morning. I think makeup can be empowering, but I think that acknowledging that it isn’t natural is important. Modeling and wearing makeup so often makes me especially feel like its important to sometimes be uncomfortably honest about how much of the media we consume is altered in some way. Part of me wanted to wait until my skin was better to do this concept but I realized that was totally missing the point. Thanks for taking the time to read.Photography and Graphic Design by Mark Laubenheimer.

sierramckenzie:

This is hard for me to post but I feel like it is important. 

I remember hating my face and hating my skin and looking at all the girls around me in middle school and on tv and in ads and feeling like I was a monstrosity in comparison. But I remember the first time I realized women plucked their eyebrows. And wore concealer. And foundation. And powder. I felt like I had been lied to about what women look like. After modeling and realizing when photographers asked for no makeup, they really meant the photo on the right. I started realizing that the photo on the right was what was in skincare ads and posted by people claiming in the caption to be wearing no makeup some of the time. The photo on the right is the bare minimum of what we expect women to look like when they wake up in the morning. 

I think makeup can be empowering, but I think that acknowledging that it isn’t natural is important. Modeling and wearing makeup so often makes me especially feel like its important to sometimes be uncomfortably honest about how much of the media we consume is altered in some way. 

Part of me wanted to wait until my skin was better to do this concept but I realized that was totally missing the point. 

Thanks for taking the time to read.

Photography and Graphic Design by Mark Laubenheimer.

7 months ago with notes (77811)    via (root)








ALH