agirlcalledfrost:

darkestgreen:

thebestworstidea:

resilientkate:

softgore:


“This piece was primarily a trust exercise, in which she told viewers she would not move for six hours no matter what they did to her.  She placed 72 objects one could use in pleasing or destructive ways, ranging from flowers and a feather boa to a knife and a loaded pistol, on a table near her and invited the viewers to use them on her however they wanted.  
Initially, Abramović said, viewers were peaceful and timid, but it escalated to violence quickly.  “The experience I learned was that … if you leave decision to the public, you can be killed… I felt really violated: they cut my clothes, stuck rose thorns in my stomach, one person aimed the gun at my head, and another took it away. It created an aggressive atmosphere. After exactly 6 hours, as planned, I stood up and started walking toward the public. Everyone ran away, escaping an actual confrontation.”
This piece revealed something terrible about humanity, similar to what Philip Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison Experiment or Stanley Milgram’s Obedience Experiment, both of which also proved how readily people will harm one another under unusual circumstances.” 
This performance showed just how easy it is to dehumanize a person who doesn’t fight back, and is particularly powerful because it defies what we think we know about ourselves. I’m certain the no one reading this believes the people around him/her capable of doing such things to another human being, but this performance proves otherwise.”

this is why performance art is important


So every single person who told me ‘ignore them they’ll go away’ and ‘you can’t let them know they bothered you’ and ‘They’ll stop if they don’t see you react’ and all that bull shit, my entire school career, I want you to look good and hard at this.
I want you to think about what you said.
What you keep saying.
What you are telling your children.
You are making them powerless.

that last comment. actually crying.

I hate this story. It’s such an important story, and she’s a very important artist, and everyone should read this and know about it. I love how powerful and brave it is. It says so much about what we are and how we need to be better.
But I hate it so much.

agirlcalledfrost:

darkestgreen:

thebestworstidea:

resilientkate:

softgore:

“This piece was primarily a trust exercise, in which she told viewers she would not move for six hours no matter what they did to her.  She placed 72 objects one could use in pleasing or destructive ways, ranging from flowers and a feather boa to a knife and a loaded pistol, on a table near her and invited the viewers to use them on her however they wanted. 

Initially, Abramović said, viewers were peaceful and timid, but it escalated to violence quickly.  “The experience I learned was that … if you leave decision to the public, you can be killed… I felt really violated: they cut my clothes, stuck rose thorns in my stomach, one person aimed the gun at my head, and another took it away. It created an aggressive atmosphere. After exactly 6 hours, as planned, I stood up and started walking toward the public. Everyone ran away, escaping an actual confrontation.”

This piece revealed something terrible about humanity, similar to what Philip Zimbardo’s Stanford Prison Experiment or Stanley Milgram’s Obedience Experiment, both of which also proved how readily people will harm one another under unusual circumstances.”

This performance showed just how easy it is to dehumanize a person who doesn’t fight back, and is particularly powerful because it defies what we think we know about ourselves. I’m certain the no one reading this believes the people around him/her capable of doing such things to another human being, but this performance proves otherwise.”

this is why performance art is important

So every single person who told me ‘ignore them they’ll go away’ and ‘you can’t let them know they bothered you’ and ‘They’ll stop if they don’t see you react’ and all that bull shit, my entire school career, I want you to look good and hard at this.

I want you to think about what you said.

What you keep saying.

What you are telling your children.

You are making them powerless.

that last comment. actually crying.

I hate this story. It’s such an important story, and she’s a very important artist, and everyone should read this and know about it. I love how powerful and brave it is. It says so much about what we are and how we need to be better.

But I hate it so much.

7 months ago with notes (416443)    via (root)








Source: andrewfishman Via: muffinw
doctorhowmany:

ironychan:

pepperjohnrogers:

cumberbum:

The Bystander Effect - The Bystander Effect is a social phenomenon in which a person (or persons) are less likely to offer help to another person (or persons) when there are more people around who can also provide assistance. Many people believe that, when there is an emergency and lots of people are present, the people in need are more likely to get assistance. However, this is not the case. Rather, the more people there are who can help, the less likely each person is to offer help. Thus, when in a group, people are less likely to offer help than when they are alone.

I’m going to hijack this post to talk about what you should do to combat the bystander effect. The bystander effect is very real and can have some very serious consequences. People die all the time because of the bystander effect. 
If you know CPR and you see someone in distress, congratulations you are now in charge. Don’t stand around and wait for someone else to do something. You are officially the most capable person on scene. 
Start CPR immediately. While you’re at it, pick someone in the crowd and point to them. Loudly say, “You call 911!”. Do Not say “someone call 911”. If you say “someone” everyone there is going to think that someone else is “someone”. You have to pick a specific person. 
If you don’t know CPR and aren’t capable of offering any direct assistance, it is officially your job to call for emergency services. If you don’t have a cellphone, start looking for a phone or someone else who has a phone. 
Whenever you are in doubt about whether or not you need to take action, remember the bystander effect. Remember that other people will be in doubt too, and those other people may not be armed with the knowledge you have. 
If you pass a car accident on the highway and think “I’m sure someone else has already called it in” remember that everyone else who passed thought the exact same thing. Call it in. Emergency services would rather receive 100 calls about the same accident than not receive any calls at all. 

I try really hard to keep this in mind whenever I see any sort of emergency.

This effect is so strong that people often don’t act even when their own lives are in danger. If you are in a waiting room full of people and the air vent starts seething smoke, congratulations, it’s your job to go right the fuck up to the receptionist and tell them to call the fire brigade.

doctorhowmany:

ironychan:

pepperjohnrogers:

cumberbum:

The Bystander Effect - The Bystander Effect is a social phenomenon in which a person (or persons) are less likely to offer help to another person (or persons) when there are more people around who can also provide assistance. Many people believe that, when there is an emergency and lots of people are present, the people in need are more likely to get assistance. However, this is not the case. Rather, the more people there are who can help, the less likely each person is to offer help. Thus, when in a group, people are less likely to offer help than when they are alone.

I’m going to hijack this post to talk about what you should do to combat the bystander effect. The bystander effect is very real and can have some very serious consequences. People die all the time because of the bystander effect. 

If you know CPR and you see someone in distress, congratulations you are now in charge. Don’t stand around and wait for someone else to do something. You are officially the most capable person on scene. 

Start CPR immediately. While you’re at it, pick someone in the crowd and point to them. Loudly say, “You call 911!”. Do Not say “someone call 911”. If you say “someone” everyone there is going to think that someone else is “someone”. You have to pick a specific person

If you don’t know CPR and aren’t capable of offering any direct assistance, it is officially your job to call for emergency services. If you don’t have a cellphone, start looking for a phone or someone else who has a phone. 

Whenever you are in doubt about whether or not you need to take action, remember the bystander effect. Remember that other people will be in doubt too, and those other people may not be armed with the knowledge you have. 

If you pass a car accident on the highway and think “I’m sure someone else has already called it in” remember that everyone else who passed thought the exact same thing. Call it in. Emergency services would rather receive 100 calls about the same accident than not receive any calls at all. 

I try really hard to keep this in mind whenever I see any sort of emergency.

This effect is so strong that people often don’t act even when their own lives are in danger. If you are in a waiting room full of people and the air vent starts seething smoke, congratulations, it’s your job to go right the fuck up to the receptionist and tell them to call the fire brigade.

8 months ago with notes (49016)    via (root)








Source: cumberbum Via: janisonfire

facebooksexism:

To the person asking about the word crazy: As someone with mental illness (severe depression and moderate anxiety), it’s really only ever bothered me when used to describe a person or idea negatively. A crazy ex, a crazy driver, “that’s crazy!” to describe someone’s opinion you disagree with, a crazy person on the subway, etc., because this attributes their negative traits to mental illness (even if unknowingly or in jest) and further stigmatizes it. I use it myself to describe some things (that thunderstorm was crazy, “that’s crazy!” to describe an especially noteworthy coincidence, this pizza is crazy good). While I think most people don’t use it with the intent of speaking negatively or insultingly about mental illness, when used as a stand in for “irrational” or “unfair” or any other negative descriptor, it contributes to a harmful stereotype and stigma in our cultural mindset that does real harm to people with mental illness.

I agree. Just today my tutor for psychology mentioned the Mental Health and Disabilities Services, and how to utilize them, and she summarized by saying, “Coz this course will make you go THAT crazy!” I get that it was a lighthearted joke, but as someone who uses those services, it felt insulting. Also, I guess I expected a bit more respect from someone who works in the psychology department :/

8 months ago with notes (29)    via (root)








"You understand that the whole concept of “white privilege” is basically never mentioned outside tumblr, correct?"

TUMBLR USER WILLS4545 (via lordbape)

let’s all point our fingers and laugh

(via theyellowfeministfatale)

8 months ago with notes (66)    via (root)








Take Two 'Normal' People, Add Money To Just One Of Them, And Watch What Happens Next

This is fascinating.

9 months ago with notes (33)    via (root)








Source: upworthy Via: shadowfaery3
Eight ways to spot Emotional Manipulation 

rozkennedy:

1. There is no use in trying to be honest with an emotional manipulator. You make a statement and it will be turned around. Example: I am really angry that you forgot my birthday. Response - “It makes me feel sad that you would think I would forget your birthday, I should have told you of the great personal stress I am facing at the moment - but you see I didn’t want to trouble you. You are right I should have put all this pain (don’t be surprised to see real tears at this point) aside and focused on your birthday. Sorry.” Even as you are hearing the words you get the creeped out sensation that they really do NOT mean they are sorry at all - but since they’ve said the words you’re pretty much left with nothing more to say. Either that or you suddenly find yourself babysitting their angst!! Under all circumstances if you feel this angle is being played - don’t capitulate! Do not care take - do not accept an apology that feels like bullshit. If it feels like bullshit - it probably is. Rule number one - if dealing with an emotional blackmailer TRUST your gut. TRUST your senses. Once an emotional manipulator finds a successful maneuver - it’s added to their hit list and you’ll be fed a steady diet of this shit.

2. An emotional manipulator is the picture of a willing helper. If you ask them to do something they will almost always agree - that is IF they didn’t volunteer to do it first. Then when you say, “ok thanks” - they make a bunch of heavy sighs, or other non verbal signs that let you know they don’t really want to do whatever said thing happens to be. When you tell them it doesn’t seem like they want to do whatever - they will turn it around and try to make it seem like OF COURSE they wanted to and how unreasonable you are. This is a form of crazy making - which is something emotional manipulators are very good at. Rule number two - If an emotional manipulator said YES - make them accountable for it. Do NOT buy into the sighs and subtleties - if they don’t want to do it - make them tell you it up front - or just put on the walk-man headphones and run a bath and leave them to their theater.

3. Crazy making - saying one thing and later assuring you they did not say it. If you find yourself in a relationship where you figure you should start keeping a log of what’s been said because you are beginning to question your own sanity —You are experiencing emotional manipulation. An emotional manipulator is an expert in turning things around, rationalizing, justifying and explaining things away. They can lie so smoothly that you can sit looking at black and they’ll call it white - and argue so persuasively that you begin to doubt your very senses. Over a period of time this is so insidious and eroding it can literally alter your sense of reality. WARNING: Emotional Manipulation is VERY Dangerous! It is very disconcerting for an emotional manipulator if you begin carrying a pad of paper and a pen and making notations during conversations. Feel free to let them know you just are feeling so “forgetful” these days that you want to record their words for posterity’s sake. The damndest thing about this is that having to do such a thing is a clear example for why you should be seriously thinking about removing yourself from range in the first place. If you’re toting a notebook to safeguard yourself - that ol’ bullshit meter should be flashing steady by now!

4. Guilt. Emotional manipulators are excellent guilt mongers. They can make you feel guilty for speaking up or not speaking up, for being emotional or not being emotional enough, for giving and caring, or for not giving and caring enough. Any thing is fair game and open to guilt with an emotional manipulator. Emotional manipulators seldom express their needs or desires openly - they get what they want through emotional manipulation. Guilt is not the only form of this but it is a potent one. Most of us are pretty conditioned to do whatever is necessary to reduce our feelings of guilt. Another powerful emotion that is used is sympathy. An emotional manipulator is a great victim. They inspire a profound sense of needing to support, care for and nurture. Emotional Manipulators seldom fight their own fights or do their own dirty work. The crazy thing is that when you do it for them (which they will never ask directly for), they may just turn around and say they certainly didn’t want or expect you to do anything! Try to make a point of not fighting other people’s battles, or doing their dirty work for them. A great line is “I have every confidence in your ability to work this out on your own” - check out the response and note the bullshit meter once again.

5. Emotional manipulators fight dirty. They don’t deal with things directly. They will talk around behind your back and eventually put others in the position of telling you what they would not say themselves. They are passive aggressive, meaning they find subtle ways of letting you know they are not happy little campers. They’ll tell you what they think you want to hear and then do a bunch of jerk off shit to undermine it. Example: “Of course I want you to go back to school honey and you know I’ll support you.” Then exam night you are sitting at the table and poker buddies show up, the kids are crying the t.v. blasting and the dog needs walking - all the while “Sweetie” is sitting on their ass looking at you blankly. Dare you call them on such behavior you are likely to hear, “well you can’t expect life to just stop because you have an exam can you honey?” Cry, scream or choke ‘em - only the last will have any long-term benefits and it’ll probably wind your butt in jail.

6. If you have a headache an emotional manipulator will have a brain tumor! No matter what your situation is the emotional manipulator has probably been there or is there now - but only ten times worse. It’s hard after a period of time to feel emotionally connected to an emotional manipulator because they have a way of de-railing conversations and putting the spotlight back on themselves. If you call them on this behavior they will likely become deeply wounded or very petulant and call you selfish - or claim that it is you who are always in the spotlight. The thing is that even tho you know this is not the case you are left with the impossible task of proving it. Don’t bother - TRUST your gut and walk away!

7. Emotional manipulators somehow have the ability to impact the emotional climate of those around them. When an emotional manipulator is sad or angry the very room thrums with it - it brings a deep instinctual response to find someway to equalize the emotional climate and the quickest route is by making the emotional manipulator feel better - fixing whatever is broken for them. Stick with this type of loser for too long and you will be so enmeshed and co-dependent you will forget you even have needs - let alone that you have just as much right to have your needs met.

8. Emotional manipulators have no sense of accountability. They take no responsibility for themselves or their behavior - it is always about what everyone else has “done to them”. One of the easiest ways to spot an emotional manipulator is that they often attempt to establish intimacy through the early sharing of deeply personal information that is generally of the “hook-you-in-and-make-you-sorry-for-me” variety. Initially you may perceive this type of person as very sensitive, emotionally open and maybe a little vulnerable. Believe me when I say that an emotional manipulator is about as vulnerable as a rabid pit bull, and there will always be a problem or a crisis to overcome.

9 months ago with notes (74)    via (root)








Via: rozkennedy

ghosttownfrown:

Your professor will not be happy with you if he says the Stanford Prison Experiment shows human nature and you say it shows the nature of white middle class college-aged boys.

Like he will not be happy at all.

1 year ago with notes (30291)    via (root)








COUNSELLING BLOG: Some Curses of Being Highly Sensitive

alimarko:

onlinecounsellingcollege:

People who are highly sensitive, often struggle with the following:

1. They are easily overwhelmed, and often feel stressed through being overstimulated: That is, they often feel exhausted, stressed, worn out and worn down by processing so much detail - or through vicariously experiencing too much pain in the lives of others.

2. They are more personally affected by others’ emotions: Thus, they find it hard to detach themselves, or throw off the feelings and heartache of others. Instead, they tend to absorb anger, pain and distress when others  around them are experiencing these.  

3. They need more time and space for themselves: In order to restore their boundaries, to refresh their minds and renew their energy, highly sensitive people need to retreat, and to spend time alone. Unfortunately, others may jude them as being unsociable as they don’t understand their need to withdraw.

4. They may feel driven by unhealthy perfectionism: They often have unrealistic expectations, and are harsh, unforgiving and demanding of themselves. This is because they overanalyse, and worry about what other people think and want. (Related to this, many highly sensitive people also suffer from low self-esteem.)  

5. They may feel out of sync with the people around them: The western world values extroverted people who are confident, lively and highly sociable. This can add extra pressure to more sensitive people who are cautious, and careful of the judgments of others. They can also feel they’re seen as being too sensitive, or as too emotional, or not tough enough. 

For more information see: http://psychcentral.com/blog/archives/2010/03/28/5-gifts-of-being-highly-sensitive/

I wonder if it’s possible to be “highly sensitive” and extroverted. I am most definitely an extrovert but wow, some of these describe me to a T.

However much I’ve thought about it, I cannot say whether I am an introvert or an extrovert. I know that some/most people fit into the categories perfectly, but I simply can’t. I can be both. Or maybe an extrovert with depression? Either way, I am a very sensitive person. Which can be excruciating. 

1 year ago with notes (8738)    via (root)








Possible Evolutionary Advantage of Depression 

quantumaniac:

More people die from suicide than from murder and war combined, throughout the world, every year. Research in the US and other countries estimates that between 30 to 50 percent of people have met current psychiatric diagnostic criteria for major depressive disorder sometime in their lives. But the brain plays crucial roles in promoting survival and reproduction, so the pressures of evolution should have left our brains resistant to such high rates of malfunction. Mental disorders should generally be rare — why isn’t depression?

In an article recently published in Psychological Review argues that depression is in fact an adaptation, a state of mind which brings real costs, but also brings real benefits. One reason to suspect that depression is an adaptation comes from research into a molecule in the brain known as the 5HT1A receptor. The 5HT1A receptor binds to serotonin, another brain molecule that is highly implicated in depression and is the target of most current antidepressant medications. Rodents lacking this receptor show fewer depressive symptoms in response to stress, which suggests that it is somehow involved in promoting depression. (Pharmaceutical companies, in fact, are designing the next generation of antidepressant medications to target this receptor.) When scientists have compared the composition of the functional part rat 5HT1A receptor to that of humans, it is 99 percent similar, which suggests that it is so important that natural selection has preserved it. The ability to “turn on” depression would seem to be important, then, not an accident.

Obviously, this is not to say that depression is not a problem. 

So what could be so useful about depression? Depressed people often think intensely about their problems. These thoughts are called ruminations; they are persistent and depressed people have difficulty thinking about anything else. Numerous studies have also shown that this thinking style is often highly analytical. They dwell on a complex problem, breaking it down into smaller components, which are considered one at a time.

This analytical style of thought, of course, can be very productive. Each component is not as difficult, so the problem becomes more tractable. For instance, in some of our research, we have found evidence that people who get more depressed while they are working on complex problems in an intelligence test tend to score higher on the test.

Analysis requires a lot of uninterrupted thought, and depression coordinates many changes in the body to help people analyze their problems without getting distracted. In a region of the brain known as the ventrolateral prefrontal cortex (VLPFC), neurons must fire continuously for people to avoid being distracted. But this is very energetically demanding for VLPFC neurons, just as a car’s engine eats up fuel when going up a mountain road. Moreover, continuous firing can cause neurons to break down, just as the car’s engine is more likely to break down when stressed. Studies of depression in rats show that the 5HT1A receptor is involved in supplying neurons with the fuel they need to fire, as well as preventing them from breaking down. These important processes allow depressive rumination to continue uninterrupted with minimal neuronal damage, which may explain why the 5HT1A receptor is so evolutionarily important.

Many other symptoms of depression make sense in light of the idea that analysis must be uninterrupted. The desire for social isolation, for instance, helps the depressed person avoid situations that would require thinking about other things. Similarly, the inability to derive pleasure from sex or other activities prevents the depressed person from engaging in activities that could distract him or her from the problem. Even the loss of appetite often seen in depression could be viewed as promoting analysis because chewing and other oral activity interferes with the brain’s ability to process information.

But is there any evidence that depression is useful in analyzing complex problems? For one thing, if depressive rumination were harmful, as most clinicians and researchers assume, then bouts of depression should be slower to resolve when people are given interventions that encourage rumination, such as having them write about their strongest thoughts and feelings. However, the opposite appears to be true. Several studies have found that expressive writing promotes quicker resolution of depression, and they suggest that this is because depressed people gain insight into their problems.

But depression is nature’s way of telling you that you’ve got complex social problems that the mind is intent on solving. Therapies should try to encourage depressive rumination rather than try to stop it, and they should focus on trying to help people solve the problems that trigger their bouts of depression. (There are several effective therapies that focus on just this.) It is also essential, in instances where there is resistance to discussing ruminations, that the therapist try to identify and dismantle those barriers.

When one considers all the evidence, depression seems less like a disorder where the brain is operating in a haphazard way, or malfunctioning. Instead, depression seems more like the vertebrate eye—an intricate, highly organized piece of machinery that performs a specific function.

source

1 year ago with notes (490)    via (root)








sonic-hip-attack:

wizardsvsrobots:

manatapped:

someothermiles:

villains-dont-sleep:

shavingryansprivates:

someone took the laugh track out of the big bang theory and suddenly it became really surreal and creepy

How you know your show isn’t funny.

BBT MInus Laugh Track is the next best thing since Garfield Minus Garfield.

Yeah, there is nothing funny about this show.

Look, as soon as you take out the laugh track, it becomes fairly obvious that Sheldon probably has a PDD or something and this is basically the punchline of every joke in this show

Nerds are funny

Mental disorders are funny

The brown guy has a funny accent

That’s basically the entire show in a nutshell

oh my god

this is really an interesting way to analyze what the “humor” is supposed to be

this is horrifying.

1 year ago with notes (21738)    via (root)








casual-isms:

Casual ableism is someone walking out of their Intro to Psychology class and commenting to their friend, “I don’t think psychotherapy and medication are really necessary, you just need willpower.”

Casual ableism and being a bad friend is them saying it even though their friend has a mental disorder and is getting therapy for it, and they know it.

Casual ableism is when numerous sources, including the friend and the professor of the class, cite the benefits of therapy and/or medication for various disorders, but they ignore it because they think that if you had just tried a little harder to not be depressed, you wouldn’t have been suicidal at the age of twelve and wouldn’t still need therapy now.

1 year ago with notes (41)    via (root)








ikilledcaptainclown:

archetypalboner:

“Women are more likely to be attracted to personality and men are more likely to be attracted to physical appearance”

woah maybe that’s because we teach women to see men as people and we teach men to see women as objects

Dear Human Development Professor: this.

1 year ago with notes (150410)    via (root)








Sexist humor affects social perception

It’s no secret that the internet is rampant with men making “get in the kitchen and make me a sandwich” jokes, and many women are fed up with it. One blogger, The Apple Cider Mage, regaled her readers with her experience of joining an all-male guild in “World of Warcraft” and being greeted with repetitive, sexist jokes. “If you tell me to get back in the kitchen again,” she ranted, “next time I’m bringing back a meat tenderizer.”

Another woman, who contributes to New Wave Feminism wrote about some of her male friend’s responses after she posted a political status on Facebook. One of them wrote, “I really dont like opinionated women and feel they should go back to there rightful place (back in the kitchen) and make me a sandwich.” One of his male friends chimed in “get me a beer.” She tolerated these jokes, but linked them to a video discussing retro-sexism after they made jokes involving domestic violence. They told her it would have been better if the speaker had been topless.

“I’m going to clarify this for anyone who thinks that these jokes are funny, and not insulting, and that women who don’t appreciate them are humorless bitches,” she wrote. “I have a wicked sense of humor. I like edgy jokes, I like controversial topics…Un-f***ing-fortunately, when you make these jokes, you are STILL just spewing out stupid, sexist, outdated, patronizing 1950’s gender roles.”

A study conducted by Thomas E. Ford, from the psychology department at Western Carolina University, said that such jokes actually allow some men to feel more comfortable engaging in sexist behavior without fear of disapproval from peers. “Our research demonstrates that exposure to sexist humor can create conditions that allow men – especially those who have antagonistic attitudes toward women – to express those attitudes in their behavior,” said Ford.

Ford and his colleagues asked the men who participated in the study to imagine they were in a work group. They were they asked to read either sexist jokes, comparable non-humorous sexist statements, or non-sexist jokes. Then each man was asked how much money he would donate to a women’s group. They found men reading the sexist jokes were less likely to donate than men reading the other material.

Participants were then shown sets of sexist or non-sexist comedy skits before being asked to distribute funds for student organizations. Once again, the men exposed to the sexist humor were more likely to allocate large funding cuts for a women’s organization.

“We also found that, in the presence of sexist humor, participants believed the other participants would approve of the funding cuts to women’s organizations,” said Ford. “We believe this shows that humorous disparagement creates the perception of a shared standard of tolerance of discrimination that may guide behavior when people believe others feel the same way.”

1 year ago with notes (72)  








"If women really were fated to be significantly more anxious than men, we would expect them to start showing this nervousness at a very young age, right? Yet precisely the opposite is true: According to the UCLA anxiety expert Michelle Craske, in the first few months of infants’ lives, it’s boys who show greater emotional neediness. While girls become slightly more prone to negative feelings than boys at two years (which, coincidentally, is the age at which kids begin learning gender roles), research has shown that up until age 11, girls and boys are equally likely to develop an anxiety disorder. By age 15, however, girls are six times more likely to have one than boys are."

Taylor Clark (via mindovermatterzine)

Wow: This quote I posted the other day now has 1100+ notes. I think the gendering of anxiety is really hitting home with a lot of people.

(via mindovermatterzine)

This just… I just said “WOW.” aloud.

1 year ago with notes (5836)    via (root)








lavenderlabia:

[Source] [Source] [Source]

lavenderlabia:

[Source] [Source] [Source]

1 year ago with notes (78811)    via (root)








ALH