"

So fellow cis people, the next time that you laugh, stare, point, make inappropriate jokes, sarcastic or abusive comments remember that 238 trans people were murdered this year alone. Also remember the people that have developed agoraphobia, too afraid to come out of their houses lest they be confronted by one of us that refuses to recognise their humanity. Remember people like Lucy Meadows that were driven to suicide because we did not allow her to live the life that she deserved, one free of harassment and doing a job that she enjoyed.

I have been guilty of making stupid jokes in the past when I was too ignorant to understand the full weight behind my words of which I am deeply ashamed. Don’t sit and allow others to abuse trans people either. Challenge them. You don’t have to be personally responsible for anyone’s death, being complicit by remaining silent is bad enough. Be better. Do better. We can’t bring back the trans people that have lost their lives but we can stop the body count increasing.

"
4 months ago with notes (4477)    via (root)








dispatchrabbi:

overtopsvalkyrie:

pyroclast:

outforhealth:

flameatronach:

malakhgabriel:

A proposed new (non-binary inclusive) trans* symbol.
Not gonna lie, I got a little giddy when I saw it.

I really like it. Aw man.

OH MAN HOW COOL IS THIS

Every time I see this post on my dash, I am just blown away with the levels of meaning it has. Because the asterisk has often been used as an inclusive signifier for the suffix “trans,” and the symbol is obviously referencing that.
But if you look closely, the asterisk attached to the circle contains both the female and male (Venus and Mars) symbols.


And if you know much about the meanings of astrology symbols, you could even argue that there’s a third glyph in there. Because male/Mars is drive (arrow) over spirit (circle), and female/Venus is spirit (circle) over matter (cross). And when you’ve used those, you’re left with what could be interpreted as mind (crescent) over spirit (circle). And I really think it would be quite useful for anyone who doesn’t fit in the gender binary.

So yes. All the awards to the creator!

That is beyond cool!

This is a fantastic and excellent bit of design. Good on the creators.

dispatchrabbi:

overtopsvalkyrie:

pyroclast:

outforhealth:

flameatronach:

malakhgabriel:

A proposed new (non-binary inclusive) trans* symbol.

Not gonna lie, I got a little giddy when I saw it.

I really like it. Aw man.

OH MAN HOW COOL IS THIS

Every time I see this post on my dash, I am just blown away with the levels of meaning it has. Because the asterisk has often been used as an inclusive signifier for the suffix “trans,” and the symbol is obviously referencing that.

But if you look closely, the asterisk attached to the circle contains both the female and male (Venus and Mars) symbols.

image

image

And if you know much about the meanings of astrology symbols, you could even argue that there’s a third glyph in there. Because male/Mars is drive (arrow) over spirit (circle), and female/Venus is spirit (circle) over matter (cross). And when you’ve used those, you’re left with what could be interpreted as mind (crescent) over spirit (circle). And I really think it would be quite useful for anyone who doesn’t fit in the gender binary.

image

So yes. All the awards to the creator!

That is beyond cool!

This is a fantastic and excellent bit of design. Good on the creators.

6 months ago with notes (64177)    via (root)








Source: malakhgabriel Via: muffinw

samlones:

slutc0ven:

ryan-on-bass:

Source: Orientation Police by Bill Roundy

This is cute as fuck and describes pretty accurately how I feel too.

i really enjoy this because it puts emphasis on the fact that not all men have a dick which is really important to me

7 months ago with notes (109618)    via (root)








ladyjolras:

men’s views on abortion matter if the man in question has a uterus

9 months ago with notes (17343)    via (root)








Source: khalekh Via: sanityscraps
how to interact with trans* individuals 

tattooeddicks:

i understand that cisgender people often have trouble communicating with trans* individuals. it’s okay that you don’t understand how to go about this, as you’ve grown up in a society which treats you as the default, and trans* individuals as a sort of exotic creature.

the good news is you can overcome this! you can learn to have meaningful relationships with trans* people, and to be an ally or advocate to them if they ask for your help! the bad news is it’s kind of difficult to figure out how to do this because the social norms concerning trans* people are very rigid within our society.

1) don’t ask them about their birth name. especially if you don’t know them. you aren’t going to be calling them by this anyway, so you really don’t need to know, right?

2) don’t treat them like they have a contagious disease. you cannot catch “the trans.” most generally do not bite unless you ask them to. they’re a person just like you, and you don’t want them to avoid shaking your hand for fear of catching “the cis.”

3) genitals are never a good conversation topic. seriously. it’s probably not your business. you wouldn’t go up to someone you thought was cisgender and ask about their trouserbits, don’t do it to someone you think is trans*.

4) don’t ask about surgery or hormones. there used to be stuff here about how they can be hard to obtain, but it wasn’t worded well. some trans* people don’t want them. some trans* people can’t get them. some can/do both or either of those things. it’s still not your business. at all. the state of their body and medical history aren’t your concern.

5) always refer to trans* people by their preferred gender. a trans* woman who has not yet had surgery is already a woman. getting surgery does not magically make her a woman. she already was one, she’s just helping her body match her gender. same with trans* men and nonbinary/agender people. the state of someone’s body doesn’t matter, how they identify does.

6) when in doubt, ask politely. politely is very freakin important there. if you aren’t sure what pronouns someone uses, ask them. if you aren’t sure whether a nickname is okay, ask. 

7) if they ask you not to bring something up, don’t bring it up. if someone asks you not to point it out when they’re misgendered, don’t do it. there are certain spaces where they may be safer being misgendered or misnamed. you also should not talk about anything that may remotely qualify as personal to people if your trans* pal has not told you that it’s alright to tell them.

8) if they’re upset about cis people being jerks and say something kinda mean, don’t get mad. it’s not about you. really, i promise. getting bent out of shape over a comment about cis people being giant dicks only proves the trans* person right. you are probably a very supportive friend, and don’t appreciate them making a blanket statement about a group that you belong to, but you need to recognize that a whole lot of cisgender people ARE jerks. a lot of cisgender people are going to be gigantic dicks to your trans* pal and every other trans* person.

9) not all trans* people are the same. we all have different hobbies, interests, opinions, and backgrounds. we’re just as different from one another as cis people are.

10) don’t use slurs. don’t do it. even if your trans* friends say them it is inappropriate for you to do so. slurs include: tr*nny, sh*male, tr*nsvestite (when used in the wrong context), he-she, and sometimes it. your trans* friend may be okay with you using slurs, but i’d advise against doing it altogether, as it is not your business to reclaim these words.

11) don’t out them to people. even if you’re trying to do good and correct people about their pronouns, ask first. they might not want to be outed in certain contexts. i, for example, am alright with my friends outing me when i meet their friends, because i trust their judgment in who they tell and they always do it when i’m there. if i was meeting a complete stranger, i would not want them to out me.

12) if they don’t feel like educating you, don’t push it. your friend may have had a ton of people asking them to explain things that day. when i out myself in classes, i  always get a ton of the same questions. it gets really tiring fielding the same questions over and over again. even the most avid educators get tired of answering the same questions again and again.

13) don’t tell them about someone you know who’s trans*. we don’t want to hear about your trans* cousin, or your trans* coworker. plus, when you tell us about them, you usually do it in a very problematic way.

14) under no circumstance should you, a cisgender person, say you understand exactly what a trans* person is going through in their transition because you defy the gender binary in some way. you may be a cis dude who knits, you may be a cis lady who’s a tomboy, but you do not know how it is to be transgender because you aren’t, plain and simple. you can empathize with them based on your experiences of defying the gender binary, but it’s not the same as being transgender.

15) treat them the way you treat your cis friends. this definitely doesn’t mean that you treat them as though they’re cisgender. it means that you respect their privacy, that you stick to their set boundaries, that you don’t make offensive jokes around them unless they said it’s okay, that you don’t assume things about their sexual orientation based on their gender.

i think this is about it, if there’s anything i should add, let me know!

1 year ago with notes (340)    via (root)








George Takei keeps posting things on facebook relating to sexist gender roles and I am seriously considering unliking his page.  

AND THEN HE POSTS THIS

THIS IS CISSEXIST, IGNORANT ERASURE. WAY TO FUCKING IGNORE THE ‘T’ IN ‘LGBT’ GEORGE. FOR FUCK’S SAKE.

Unliking.

Edit: Holy shit the comments on that picture make me want to cry.

insecurity and co-dependence. A match made in hell
I have never met any girl who would whine about being ugly and I personally suspect this is one of those nasty stereotypes represented by a tiny minority of stupid slags.”
Sounds like a conversation between an attention whore and a guy who is stuck in the friend zone. This is nothing cute about girls with low self esteem.”
This is funny and sweet, but pretty girls that say, “I’m ugly,” just to get attention are annoying.”
Yeah, I’m not sure I’d wanna date a girl with self esteem so low that she’d start a conversation with “I’m ugly”“
"Girl: I’m ugly.
Boy: By the gods, you’re right! I’m out of here, time to find a girl with self-confidence!”
"If your girlfriend says she’s ugly, agree and get a new girlfriend. Don’t waste time on dramatic attention whores."
"Psh, dump her and get a girl with some self esteem for a change."

1 year ago with notes (16)  








1 year ago with notes (2637)    via (root)








Via: ruinicorn
New Zealand proposes third gender option for passports 

qbits:

Kiwis might be able to describe themselves as M, F or X on passports, if proposed changes go through in September
A New Zealand passport application could soon have options for M, F or X

The New Zealand government is reviewing gender options on passports and looking into more flexibility for transgender citizens.

The Department of Internal Affairs suggests that New Zealanders can chose M, F or X to describe their gender, with only a statutory witness declaration needed as confirmation, not a medical certificate.

If a transgender person changes identity on the passport, it would be shown on that document only and not on birth certificates or citizenship records.

Currently the Births, Deaths and Marriages Act 1995 legislates that an adult or guardian of a child can apply to have their birth certificate changed to a different gender.

The Department is asking for views about these proposals from those affected and expects to implement a new policy in September 2012.

1 year ago with notes (136)    via (root)








If you’re a feminist who understands the (apparently not) radical concept that women can have penises and men can have vaginas (and that there are people with either or both of those who may very well identify as neither a man nor a woman), would you mind reblogging this? I could really use a little faith in humanity being restored right about now.  

jemeryl:

fauxmosexualtranstrender:

I remember this post like it was yesterday at a wee twelve notes

I’m so ecstatic it just exploded

It will explode EVEN FURTHER D:

1 year ago with notes (18895)    via (root)








Source: esculentesset Via: jemeryl
alimarko:

paintwithwords:

knowhomo:

* Asterisk Uses You Should Know *
Above Graphic:
Sam from It’s Pronounced Metrosexual  weighs in on the use of the asterisk in Trans*
(read more here)


Good to know!

alimarko:

paintwithwords:

knowhomo:

* Asterisk Uses You Should Know *

Above Graphic:

Sam from It’s Pronounced Metrosexual  weighs in on the use of the asterisk in Trans*

(read more here)

Good to know!

1 year ago with notes (5409)    via (root)








Source: knowhomo Via: alimarko
PUBLIC SERVICE ANNOUNCEMENT TO ALL FEMINISTS: 

intellectual-stupidity:

I’ve said all of this before and I think it needs to be said again:

If you are a feminist and not an LGBT advocate, then you are not a feminist.

If you are a feminist and do not take intersectionality into account, then you are not a feminist.

If you are a feminist and ignore female-identifiers with disabilities, then you are not a feminist.

If you are a feminist who thinks rape jokes are funny, then you are not a feminist.

If your feminist movement does not include trans* people or women of color, then it is not a feminist movement.

If your feminism only takes your own experiences into account, then it is not feminism. 

Thank you for your time.

1 year ago with notes (155)    via (root)








Dear cis people, 

ceasesilence:

If you are using a gendered restroom, and there is someone in there that you think looks they belong in the other gendered restroom, but they are just peeing/washing their hands/fixing their makeup in the mirror/etc and not harassing you, please DO NOT:

  • call the police
  • ask or tell them that they’re in the wrong bathroom
  • yell at them
  • beat them up
  • threaten to hurt them in any way
  • whisper about them to your cis friends while they are still in the room
  • otherwise act hostile, threatening, or violent

Thank you. 

This has been a public service announcement.

1 year ago with notes (2302)    via (root)








1 year ago with notes (6283)    via (root)








"

If a cis person mispronouns me and tries to explain why it’s not their fault, I want to cry, and then I laugh in their face. As gently as I can, I tell them it is their fault and that it is not okay. I am upset with them, and I have the right to be. I am sometimes triggered by these encounters because of how unapologetically cissexist they are.

If a cis person mispronouns me, apologizes, knows it’s a big deal, and owns the fact that they fucked up and have cissexism to work through, I smile. I tell them that yeah, it’s a big deal, but it is not the end of the world, and we can still be friends. I mean it. I am rarely triggered by these encounters.

"
1 year ago with notes (126)    via (root)








In Today’s Cissexist News: This Person’s Name is Not… 

uncensoredsupplement:

dulcineadreamsincolor:

transfeminism:

When members of the media report on cis women who have changed their names—either through marriage or for some other reason—they don’t tend to say, “Jane Smith, who was born Jane Johnson.” Yet when members of the media are reporting on trans women they, as a matter of routine, almost always give the name the woman doesn’t use, saying something to the effect of: “Jane Smith, who was born John Smith.”

The difference in how cis women who have taken on new names, often by marriage, and how trans women are treated by the media is glaringly obvious. While journalist will often cite some made up journalist imperative to rationalize their use of the wrong name for trans women, these arbitrary double standards with which they report on former names are revealing.

In both cases, the former names of both cis women and trans women are not actually news. These are not the women’s names. There is no need to bring these not-their-names into the stories.

We don’t see this same thing happen with the married names of cis women. This is because there is not a strong socio-political interest in invalidating the relationships and marriages of straight, cis women. (The exception where we might see this happen is with regard to cis lesbian couples. By using a cis lesbian’s former name from before her marriage the reporter can not-so-subtly undermine the women’s relationship as less real than that of a straight cis woman who takes her husband’s name.)

So what reporters are really doing when they use names that trans women don’t go by is helping to perpetuate cissexism. They’re using those names that are traditionally associated with males in ways that misgender these women and confirm cissexist beliefs about who trans women “really” are.

This consistent invalidation and marginalization of trans women by the media is a contributing factor to the specific oppressive and violent incidents that these reporters are (poorly) covering. Over and over again, in stories reporting on the deaths of young trans women of color, the reporters will give a woman’s former name in a way that invalidates her gender as a woman. Yet these women are often killed by people using the exact same cissexist logic of disrespect and invalidation. One cannot be separated from the other. These women are not random victims in the wrong place at the wrong time. Rather, their deaths fit a very specific pattern that is reinforced by the society we live in. A society that is bolstered by the way the media reinforces these patterns in its reporting.

(boldness added)

1 year ago with notes (517)    via (root)








ALH